Author: Tony Scotti

Vehicle Static Stability Factor

STATIC STABILITY FACTOR

To ensure the safety and security of the principal, security drivers and secure transportation providers should understand that all vehicles have inherent characteristics that decrease the performance of the vehicle, and create a dangerous scenario for the principal. One of those characteristics is the vehicle’s static stability factor (SSF).

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The Computer Chip in Your Butt

When a vehicle is approaching its limit of adhesion, a driver has two conflicting signals. The first signal is the steering wheel getting light, which means that it requires less effort to increase steering input (turn the steering wheel). The reason for this is that the adhesion the tire makes with the road is getting increasingly smaller – quickly.

The second signal is the vehicle load the driver feels at the back of the seat (their butt), which at the limit of adhesion is high.

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Science-of-Security-Driving

Using 80% or above of the vehicle’s capability would more than likely only happen during an emergency (accident or ambush). But what percentage of the vehicle does a Security Driver use while maneuvering through the day to day mundane chore of moving the boss from Point A to Point B, such as driving up to an intersection and slowing down – stopping at a red light – driving on an off ramp or around a corner?

To answer that question, ISDA conducted an experiment.

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What does a lot of knowledge look like? How about two, two-inch-thick books?

A while back Joe and I decide to put all our articles, posts, white papers, and research not yet published, together in one document.

The goal of collecting the information was to determine if we had enough material for a book. When the information was collected, the results were two, two -inch-thick books. So I guess the answer is yes. The attached is a picture of one of the books, the table of contents is three pages long for each book.

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